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Food and Faith is a blog of the Presbyterian Hunger Program.

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November 9, 2015

Boston Food Justice Young Adult Volunteer – Ashley Earley

My name is Ashley Earley and I am serving as a Presbyterian Young Adult Volunteer (YAV) in Boston this year and our focus is food justice. I will be posting periodically onto this blog about various food related topics for the next year.  First, I would like to introduce myself. I am from Rock Hill, SC (just south of Charlotte, NC) and graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in May with a bachelors in biology and a minor in math. I am currently taking a gap year before going to graduate school for a master’s in plant biology and afterwards plan to go into research. I have never been to the New England area before, but I am so far really enjoying my time in Boston.


For this year, I am serving at First Presbyterian Church in Brookline and at a non-profit called Woman and Girls Thriving in Brookline with a focus in the Healthy Food and Lifestyle working group. My role will be to learn and educate about food justice.


Also as part of the program we will be participating in two different food challenges. From September to the end of January is the local eating challenge and February to the end of July is the SNAP (food stamp) challenge.


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October 9, 2015

Liturgy for the Food Week of Action!

The 2015 Liturgy for the Churches' Food Week of Action is READY!

PDF version with music

Welcome and Introduction

2015 is being commemorated as the International Year of Soils and the World Food Day 2015 focuses on Social Protection and Agriculture.

In spite of steady gains against hunger and poverty, today, more than ten percent of the population of the world; about 795 million people, are undernourished and go to bed hungry.

Let us commit ourselves in prayer, to overcome hunger and social vulnerability in our communities and across the nations!

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October 3, 2015

Corporate Ag Says They Will Feed the World. Really?

Since agriculture emerged 10,000 years ago, it has been smaller-scale producers who have fed the world. Industrial, high-tech and chemical-intensive farming has only been around for about 80 years, and still today it is small-scale farmers, ranchers, pastoralists and fishers who provide approximately 70% of all the food eaten on Earth[1].

Marketing professionals and lobbyists from Monsanto, ADM and companies promoting industrial agriculture and GMOs [we’ll call that Big Ag for shorthand] have spread a myth, which people of all stripes have swallowed. This myth claims that only large-scale industrial agriculture can feed a hungry world. The myth consists of two parts: (1) More food is the answer to feeding people; (2) Corporate, industrial agriculture is the approach that can fill this need.

First, the myth that more food will feed a hungry world.

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July 7, 2015

Top Food Stories

woman gardeningA big thank you to Adam Liebowitz at North Star Fund, a fellow member of the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems Funders, for this great collection of news on all things food and farming.


Don't Let Food Industry Stir the Pot.  Pam Kock, Huffington Post, Mar 23, 2015

The PR War Continues: Monsanto and the myth of peaceful coexistence. Laetitia Benador, Food First, Apr 2, 2015

Trade Rules Create Obstacle Course for a Better Food System. Karen Hansen-Kuhn, IATP, May 15, 2015

John Oliver Explains the Abuses of the Chicken Industry (Not the Ones You Think).  L.V. Anderson, Slate, May 18, 2015

Walmart’s Sustainability Promises: Myth vs. Reality. Steve Holt, Civil Eats, Jun 5, 2015

Egg rationing in America has officially begun.  Roberto Ferdman, Washington Post, Jun 5, 2015

Whole Foods Markets: Throwing Organic Farmers Under the Bus? Cornucopia Institute, Jun 12, 2015


Climate Change Poses Serious Threats to Food Distribution.  Elizabeth Grossman, Earth Island Journal, Mar 4, 2015

Let's put an end to factory farming.  Tom Colicchio, CNN, Apr 6, 2015
Food, Farming and Climate Change: It’s Bigger than Everything Else. Ryan Zinn, Common Dreams, Apr 13, 2015
Feeding the future through agroecology. Dr. M. Jahi Chappell and Tara Ritter. IATP, Apr 21, 2015


Racism and Capitalism: Dual Challenges for the Food Movement.  Eric Holt-Gimenez, Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development.  Mar 25, 2014

The Color of Food: America's Invisible Farmers.  Natasha Bowens, Civil Eats, Apr 14, 2015

The Color of Food: Building Autonomy as African American Farmers.  Natasha Bowens, Civil Eats, Apr 14, 2015

Promised a Supermarket Five Years Ago, a Housing Project Is Still Waiting. Keith Williams, New York Times, Apr 17, 2015

The World Bank’s Long War on Peasants.  Eric Holt-Giménez and Tanya M. Kerssen, Food First, Apr 20, 2015

What happened to America’s black farmers?  Madeleine Thomas,Grist, Apr 24, 2015

Justice for farmworkers as labor rights bill makes overdue progress in the New York State Senate.  Editorial, NY Daily News, May 3, 2015

Can We Finally Treat Food Workers Fairly?  Mark Bittman, New York Times, May 27, 2015

The New Food Movement Has a Problem with Race.  Lauren Rothman, Mucnhies, May 29, 2015

The Food Revolution and the War for Our Minds.  Jonathan Latham, Rural America, Jun 12, 2015


Fewer NYC teens are drinking sodas: study.  Carl Campanile, NY Post, Apr 6, 2015
As Global Food Chain Grows, So Does Risk of Illness.  Maryn McKenna, National Geographic, Apr 7, 2015
Food System Recommendations Should Account for More Than Public Health.  Gabrielle Blavatsky, EcoCentric, Apr 21, 2015

Lessons from Supermarket Failure in a Food Desert. Kate McCleary, Liveable Future, May 5, 2015

School Lunch May Be Next to Nudge Antibiotics Off the Plate.  Maryn McKenna, National Geographic, May 8, 2015 

What Happened After One Family Went Organic For Just Two Weeks.  Huffington Post, May 14, 2015
France to force big supermarkets to give unsold food to charities.  Angelique Chrisafis, The Guardian, May 22, 2015

Former Trader Joe’s Exec Opens Super Cheap Nonprofit Supermarket. Brad Tuttle, Time, Jun 4, 2015
Restaurants Pan New York City’s Plan for High-Salt Labels. Melanie Grayce West, Wall Street Journal, Jun 10, 2015
The Daily Table: Is This What We Really Need?  Mark Winne, Beacon Broadside, Jun 30, 2015 


CT jumps into top 10 in locally produced food index. Hartford Business, Apr 7, 2015

In Newark, a Vertical Indoor Farm Helps Anchor an Area’s Revival. C.J. Hughes, New York Times, Apr 7, 2015

Why “Clean Label” School Lunch May Be a Pipe Dream. Bettina Elias Siegel, Civil Eats, Apr 9, 2015

Council Members Ask De Blasio to Invest in Farmland. Samar Khurshid, Gotham Gazette, Apr 21, 2015

Craft Distilleries and Breweries Take Hold in South Bronx.  Winnue Hu, New York Trimes, Apr 22, 2015

USDA Report Shows Increase in Activity of Local and Regional Food Systems.  AJ Hughes, Seedstock, May 10, 2015

Vermont: America’s Food Relocalization Laboratory.  Steve Holt, Civil Eats, May 13, 2015

Let’s Help Create More Farmers.  Mark Bittman, New York Times, Jun 10, 2015

30 Women Under 30 Changing Food. Danielle Nierenberg, Huffington Post, Jun 23, 2015

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June 29, 2015

Resources for Refugee Gardens

Planning your church refugee garden

Are you interested in beginning your own church refugee garden? We're sharing these documents created by Arrive Ministries to support your endeavor and help address some frequently asked questions.

Contact a local refugee organization or Catholic Charities to see what programs may already exist and to begin developing relationships with refugees in your area.

Church Garden Models contains a listing of the types of refugee gardens that have been established here in the Twin Cities. There are a number of different ways churches can engage in gardens; you may even come up with new ideas of your own!

Church Gardening Goals provides a list of reasons for churches to create gardens for refugees. These reasons are some of the ones cited by those hosting church gardens and refugee gardeners and are helpful in enlisting support of your local church board and membership.

Church Gardens Sample Guidelines is a list of rules based on First Evangelical Free Church (Maplewood) Harvest Community Gardens model. Many area churches develop a similar list and provide it to gardeners at the start of the season, usually as a part of gardener orientation. First Evangelical Free Church has many years experience of conducting a community garden on a large scale. In 2014 they had more than 1200 plots!

Matters to Consider is a document that has been compiled through evaluations and discussions with existing church gardens. These are their suggestions to others – things they felt everyone should be aware of before beginning a garden project.


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ~ Gardening, Food & Faith

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