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A more expansive view

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LeeLee Hinson-Hasty is coordinator for theological education and seminary relations in the Presbyterian Mission Agency of the PC (U.S.A.). Through his work Lee hopes to capture and share a more expansive view of theological education, of church leadership and of vocational discernment as he sees through the eyes of some exciting Presbyterians in and related to seminaries.

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Office of Theological Education

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December 30, 2013

Accounting for Hope

I welcome and thank Edwin David Aponte, Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of Christianity and Culture at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

When I told someone that I was asked to reflect on the future of theological education, I was asked, “Is there a future for theological education?” That is a reasonable question given that theological education in the United States is at a crossroads of relevancy and effectiveness to church and society. 


December 27, 2013

Back to the Future: A Sankofa Moment

I welcome and thank Paul Roberts, president-dean of Johnson C. Smith Theological Seminary as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

17 If you say to yourself, “These nations are more numerous than I; how can I dispossess them?” 18 do not be afraid of them. Just remember what the Lord your God did to 

December 23, 2013

Preparation for Ministry Without A Safety Net

I welcome and thank Kathy Wolf Reed, Associate Pastor at First Presbyterian Church, Tuscaloosa, Alabama and  the chairperson of the the Committee on Theological Education as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

Week after week as I serve Christ’s church, I see theological education from some varied venues.  As a pastor I see theological education playing out in Sunday school rooms and Bible studies, members of our church giving up free evenings to study Scripture together and vacation time to attend continuing education events.  As a member of my seminary’s alumni council I am twice a year invited to come see what God is doing on the campus whose halls I once roamed – now complete with technological innovations I could not have imagined possible that first summer as I sat in the hallway on my laptop straining to find just the right spot where I could connect to the unreliable wifi.  


December 20, 2013

What Mandela and Pastors Have In Common

I welcome and thank Laura Mariko Cheifetz, Executive Director of Church & Public Relations at the Presbyterian Publishing Corporation as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?  This blog is her reflections on a conversation she had with me recently. Read this post for more about this series.

 

“‘People are rejecting leaders who rule by the formal authority of their position and command by hierarchical power,’ said Seidman, but ‘they are craving genuine leadership — leaders who lead by their moral authority to inspire, to elevate others and to enlist us in a shared journey.’”

Thomas Friedman, December 10, 2013, “Why Mandela Was Unique”

Some say there is no future in theological education. 


December 18, 2013

Lighter on Our Feet into the Wide Open Arms of God

I welcome and thank Wendy Fletcher, professor of the History of Christianity at Vancouver School of Theology and chair of the board of the Fund for Theological Education as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

Writing at the end of the 1960's, Canadian author Pierre Burton observed that theological education, rather than serving as a vanguard which helped the rapidly changing church blaze a path to the future, functioned instead as a rearguard action that lagged behind the church sweeping up the pieces. Too often, in the immediately preceding decades, this has been all too true.

Of course I do believe that our seminaries and theological schools intended otherwise. 

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