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New Form of Government questions and answers

July 15, 2010

MINNEAPOLIS

A summary of the 219th General Assembly’s action to approve the new Form of Government:

What happened? What changed?

The General Assembly voted to recommend a revised Form of Government to the presbyteries by a vote of 468 in favor, 204 against, and 6 abstentions — a 70%-30% margin. The new Form of Government includes:

  • Foundations of Presbyterian Polity — the principles that are foundational to government, worship, and discipline for the PC(USA) — preserves the vast majority of the material in the first four chapters of the current Form of Government.
  • Form of Government — in six chapters, which spells out the constitutional framework for government of the PC(USA) as it seeks to respond to God's call to life in mission.
  • Advisory Handbook for Councils for the Development of Policies and Procedures —  required by the Form of Government as an aid to councils (governing bodies) of the church for developing the policies and procedures to carry out their mission.

Nothing has changed until a majority of presbyteries vote to approve this new Form of Government. Voting must be completed by July 10, 2011, and if affirmative, the new Book of Order would take effect the next day.

What does it mean?

The current Form of Government has served the church ably over the past quarter century. The bedrock historic principles of Presbyterian governance will continue to order our lives together today and into the future, just as they have guided those who witnessed before us. At the same time, the world in which we as 21st-century Presbyterians proclaim the gospel is not the world of the 1950s, or even the 1980s. The proposed Foundations of Presbyterian Polity and Form of Government are intended to help the church better meet the needs of mission in the 21st century. The Foundations of Presbyterian Polity gathers together in three succinct chapters the historical and theological provisions that have defined, and continue to define, our church life together. Placing this bedrock material into a separate section of the Book of Order provides an excellent teaching tool to explain who and what we are. The current Form of Government has evolved over the years from a Constitution into a regulatory manual that attempts to provide a "one size fits all" answer to every situation faced by congregations and presbyteries. The problem with this regulatory approach is that the diverse, multicultural environment in which we do mission no longer permits a "one size fits all" approach if we are to do mission effectively. The proposed new Form of Government lifts up the constitutional standards that are essential to our life together, while at the same time empowering councils (governing bodies) at all levels to respond more effectively to the ministry and mission needs that each faces.

What's  next?

The revised Form of Government must now be considered, and approved by a majority of presbyteries, before July 10, 2011, in order to replace the existing Form of Government.

Where can I learn more?

The document, as amended by the Assembly, is available now at the PC-Biz website. A formatted version will be developed and made available online and in hard copy.

  1. This sheet contains no description of what the GA did to change the proposal from the Task Force. Considerable changes were adopted. But how would anyone know from this? This is less than helpful "information." James R. Tony

    by James R. Tony

    July 17, 2010

  2. When there is a conflict between the Foundations portion of the proposed new Form of Government and the Form of Government section will one take precedence over the other in the courts of the church?

    by Marie Bowen

    July 16, 2010

  3. What is so unique about the 21st century as compared to the 5th or even the 19th century. People everywhere are the same now as then. They have the same problems now as then just not in the technical way we live. Their need for shelter, clothes, a feeling of acceptance, a need to be loved, and food for the body and spirit are all needed now as then. Can man supply these any better than God? Can a new form of government supply what God himself and his son Jesus supply?

    by Robert N.Ivy

    July 16, 2010

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