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Food and Faith is a blog of the Presbyterian Hunger Program.

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June 29, 2015

Resources for Refugee Gardens

Planning your church refugee garden

Are you interested in beginning your own church refugee garden? We're sharing these documents created by Arrive Ministries to support your endeavor and help address some frequently asked questions.

Contact a local refugee organization or Catholic Charities to see what programs may already exist and to begin developing relationships with refugees in your area.

Church Garden Models contains a listing of the types of refugee gardens that have been established here in the Twin Cities. There are a number of different ways churches can engage in gardens; you may even come up with new ideas of your own!

Church Gardening Goals provides a list of reasons for churches to create gardens for refugees. These reasons are some of the ones cited by those hosting church gardens and refugee gardeners and are helpful in enlisting support of your local church board and membership.

Church Gardens Sample Guidelines is a list of rules based on First Evangelical Free Church (Maplewood) Harvest Community Gardens model. Many area churches develop a similar list and provide it to gardeners at the start of the season, usually as a part of gardener orientation. First Evangelical Free Church has many years experience of conducting a community garden on a large scale. In 2014 they had more than 1200 plots!

Matters to Consider is a document that has been compiled through evaluations and discussions with existing church gardens. These are their suggestions to others – things they felt everyone should be aware of before beginning a garden project.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ~ Gardening, Food & Faith

Garden Safe, Garden Well Guide:  Jumpstart your community garden with & customize with your own local resources in minutes.

Food Sovereignty for All Handbook:  Create a community garden or other faith-based initiative using this resource the for guidance.

Nexus Guide: How Food, Water and Energy are Connected: Discover the hidden connections between food, water and energy in your everyday life, in the economy, and in society as a whole.


Resources: Successful Twin Cities MN Church Gardens

First Free Evangelical Church, Maplewood

International Outreach Church, Burnsville

Guardian Angels Catholic Church, Oakdale

Crossroads Alliance Church, Brooklyn Park

Karmel Covenant Church, Princeton

Peace Lutheran Church, Lauderdale

 

Resources: Technical Assistance and Networking

Gardening Matters

University of Minnesota Extension Gardening

Urban Farming

 

Resources: Websites

Creating a faith-based community garden (Sustainable Traditions)

Faith and Food: Biblical Perspectives (United Methodist Church)

Food and Faith blog (Presbyterian Hunger Program)

Starting a faith-based community garden (Godspace blog)

 

Resources: Books

Farming as a spiritual discipline

The art of the commonplace: The agrarian essays of Wendell Berry

Inheriting Paradise: Meditations on Gardening

To garden with God

Categories: Community Gardens, Hunger, Immigrant Issues, Refugees

Tags: community, garden, hunger, presbyterian, refugee, resource


June 9, 2015

Corporate Ag Says They Will Feed the World. Really?

Since agriculture emerged 10,000 years ago, it has been smaller-scale producers who have fed the world. Industrial, high-tech and chemical-intensive farming has only been around for about 80 years, and still today it is small-scale farmers, ranchers, pastoralists and fishers who provide approximately 70% of all the food eaten on Earth[1].

Marketing professionals and lobbyists from Monsanto, ADM and companies promoting industrial agriculture and GMOs [we’ll call that Big Ag for shorthand] have spread a myth, which people of all stripes have swallowed. This myth claims that only large-scale industrial agriculture can feed a hungry world. The myth consists of two parts: (1) More food is the answer to feeding people; (2) Corporate, industrial agriculture is the approach that can fill this need.

First, the myth that more food will feed a hungry world.

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April 13, 2015

Agrarian Sojourn to India & Sri Lanka

I was blessed with an eight-week extended study leave spanning from January 19, when I pointed myself in the direction of India, until March 17, when I landed back in about-to-bloom Louisville. Part of the eight weeks in India and Sri Lanka was meeting Presbyterian Hunger Program Joining Hands partners and learning about their efforts to strengthen their food sovereignty.  Part was immersing myself in this ancient/modern, spiritual/material land to learn from the people how they navigate and stay healthy in a rapidly changing world, and to rejuvenate myself as I celebrate 16 years of service to the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

This page is designed to help you virtually travel with me. You will find my crazy route, photo galleries, videos and reports. All are found on this Interactive Map and they are also listed below. Click on this link or the map to open it in another window.

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January 13, 2015

Training a new generation of farmers

The ripple effect of contributions to the Hunger Program, mostly through One Great Hour of Sharing, creates waves of support for organizations like World Hunger Relief, which trains young people like Kaley and Ester, and many more. World Hunger Relief, based on their farm in Waco, Texas, also achieves the difficult task of making connections between local hunger and global hunger. Here are the profiles of two of their interns from their website. We are proud to be a partner!

 

Intern Profile | Kaley Necessary

Food Systems Intern & Garden Club Coordinator

Kaley comes to us from Indiana Wesleyan University, where she graduated in the spring of 2014 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and Pre-Medicine. She also received a minor in International Community Development. Passionate about public health, Kaley became an intern with the Uganda Village Project. She was in Iganga, Uganda for 3 months where she worked as a public health educator conducting weekly education sessions on malaria, sexually transmitted infections, intestinal parasite prevention, family planning methods, nutrition, hygiene and sanitation, and safe water. Her “desire to see people take ownership of their health and well being” grew stronger while in Uganda.

Kaley has strong passions for development and agriculture. In Uganda, she realized her desire to address public health issues through the gateway of agriculture. After her time at World Hunger Relief, Kaley will continue to pursue knowledge of development and agriculture to prepare herself to serve in a developing country. She also hopes to apply her training in a community somewhere in the United States to help develop local food systems.

 

Intern Profile | Esther Honegger

Livestock Intern

Coming from Lake Zurich, IL, Esther graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2013. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science with a minor in Chemistry. Throughout college, Esther was involved in InterVarsity Christian Fellowship and the Pre-Veterinary Club at her school. She was also able to intern at the Champaign County Humane Society, where she monitored the medical and behavioral statuses of the resident animals.

During her participation in InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Esther had the privilege to attend a 3-week mission trip to Malawi, Africa, where she served at an orphanage. She was able to teach the children about basic animal biology and directed her teammates in helping her with daily activities.

Esther is using her time at WHRI to learn practical skills in animal agriculture so that she can serve people in a more comprehensive way. She plans to use this knowledge and the knowledge from her studies “to benefit the people of developing nations who don’t have the opportunities to learn about animal biology and health in the depth that I have.”

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December 30, 2014

Water, Water Everywhere But Not a Drop to Drink

As someone who is passionate about sustainable food, urban farming, nutrition, and many of the various aspects of the food justice work I sometimes find the amount of organizations and resources in the field to be overwhelming; mostly in a good way as the food system we currently have could be much improved. However, on occasion I'm overwhelmed in a negative way.

 

I've been looking for a job in the field for 6+ months now- depending on what your opinion of really looking is- and I've applied to quite a few jobs. I have yet to be ...

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