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A more expansive view

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LeeLee Hinson-Hasty is coordinator for theological education and seminary relations in the Presbyterian Mission Agency of the PC (U.S.A.). Through his work Lee hopes to capture and share a more expansive view of theological education, of church leadership and of vocational discernment as he sees through the eyes of some exciting Presbyterians in and related to seminaries.

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Office of Theological Education

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Posts with tag: seminaries

March 12, 2014

Midwifing What’s Next in Theological Education Together

 wonder, if midwifery as a metaphor frames what we are doing together as a the Committee on Theological Education, TEF Seminary Support Network, community in theological education in the PC(USA), and the PC(USA) more broadly?  Could we midwife theological schools, theological educators, church leaders and church bodies who are giving birth to what’s next in theological education and the church?

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December 30, 2013

Accounting for Hope

I welcome and thank Edwin David Aponte, Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of Christianity and Culture at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

When I told someone that I was asked to reflect on the future of theological education, I was asked, “Is there a future for theological education?” That is a reasonable question given that theological education in the United States is at a crossroads of relevancy and effectiveness to church and society. 

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December 23, 2013

Preparation for Ministry Without A Safety Net

I welcome and thank Kathy Wolf Reed, Associate Pastor at First Presbyterian Church, Tuscaloosa, Alabama and  the chairperson of the the Committee on Theological Education as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

Week after week as I serve Christ’s church, I see theological education from some varied venues.  As a pastor I see theological education playing out in Sunday school rooms and Bible studies, members of our church giving up free evenings to study Scripture together and vacation time to attend continuing education events.  As a member of my seminary’s alumni council I am twice a year invited to come see what God is doing on the campus whose halls I once roamed – now complete with technological innovations I could not have imagined possible that first summer as I sat in the hallway on my laptop straining to find just the right spot where I could connect to the unreliable wifi.  

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December 20, 2013

What Mandela and Pastors Have In Common

I welcome and thank Laura Mariko Cheifetz, Executive Director of Church & Public Relations at the Presbyterian Publishing Corporation as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?  This blog is her reflections on a conversation she had with me recently. Read this post for more about this series.

 

“‘People are rejecting leaders who rule by the formal authority of their position and command by hierarchical power,’ said Seidman, but ‘they are craving genuine leadership — leaders who lead by their moral authority to inspire, to elevate others and to enlist us in a shared journey.’”

Thomas Friedman, December 10, 2013, “Why Mandela Was Unique”

Some say there is no future in theological education. 

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December 13, 2013

Engaging & Changing the World

I welcome and thank Susan Fox, director of Supervised Ministry and Vocational Planning at Union Presbyterian Seminary as a guest blogger in an Advent series answering the question, What is coming and becoming in theological education?Read this post for more about this series.

The Huffington Post recently published an article by Wayne Meisel, a Presbyterian minister whose many hats include working with the Faith3 initiative. This programis designed to support and resource the Church in its efforts to share the gospel with young adults in ways that significantly impact their lives. The title of the Post article,“Seminaries that Change the World. 

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September 13, 2013

Fire in the Leaves: What’s Stoking in Seminaries Today

My teenage son, Garrison, called my attention to it, because I only glanced at the painting. He looked longer and more deeply. “Did you see that, Dad?” “What?” Pointing to one of dozens of paintings in The Civil War and American Art collection on tour from the Smithsonian at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. We’d seen hundreds of paintings already that day and this one did not catch my eye. “Look!” I still didn’t see what he was talking about. 

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May 1, 2013

Seminary Enrollment

Two stories came across my desk over the last week that seek to describe the phenomenon of decline in the church in drastically different ways.  One is a quote from one of two April PC(USA) Board of Pensions Regional Benefits consultations.  The second is one of the first articles published on the research by Barbara Wheeler and Tony Ruger, two Presbyterians, on their extensive and decades old research on seminarians and enrollment.  One seems to say seminaries are sending more graduates to the church and the other alludes to the church sending fewer students to seminary.  

Both make me wonder, what is God up to and calling the Church to do?

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September 24, 2012

Bold Moves in Theological Education

Earlier this month my friend and colleague, Stephen Lewis, President of the Fund for Theological Education (FTE), announced that the vast majority of FTE's generous fellowships are under review during a strategic planning process of the board and staff.  For almost six decades FTE has cultivated new generations of diverse leaders in the church and the theological academy, but now is a time to step back before stepping forward.

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